Jack Harkaway and his Sons Escape from the Brigands of Greece

Bracebridge Hemyng
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Jack Harkaway and his Son's Escape from the Brigands of Greece

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Title: Jack Harkaway and His Son's Escape From the Brigand's of Greece
Author: Bracebridge Hemyng
Release Date: January, 2005 [EBook #7335] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on April 15, 2003]
Edition: 10
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-Latin-1
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JACK HARKAWAY AND HIS SON'S ESCAPE FROM THE BRIGANDS OF GREECE.
BEING THE CONTINUATION OF "JACK HARKAWAY AND HIS SON'S ADVENTURES IN GREECE."
BY BRACEBRIDGE HEMYNG
[Illustration: Bother the beggars"--said Mr Mole"--Adv in Greece, Vol II--_Frontispiece_]
CHAPTER I.
THE CONTESSA'S LETTER TO MR. MOLE--ON PLEASURE BENT--THE MENDICANT FRIAR--MIDNIGHT MARAUDERS--HOUSE BREAKING.
When Mrs. Harkaway's maid returned to the villa, she got scolded for being so long upon an errand of some importance with which she had been entrusted.
Thereupon, she was prepared with twenty excuses, all of which were any thing but the truth.
The words of warning which the brigand had called after her had not been without their due effect.
"She had been detained," she said, "by the Contessa Maraviglia for the letter which she brought back to Mr. Mole."
The letter was an invitation to a grand ball which was to be given by the contessa at the Palazzo Maraviglia, and to which the Harkaways were going.
Dick Harvey had been at work in this business, and had made the contessa believe indirectly that Mr. Mole was a most graceful dancer, and that it would be an eternal shame for a _bal masqu¨¦_ to take place in the neighbourhood without being graced by his--Mole's-- presence.
The result was that during lunch Mr. Mole received from the maid the following singular effusion.
"Al Illustrissimo Signor Mole," which, being translated, means, "To the illustrious Mr. Mole."
"Hullo!" said the tutor, looking around him and dropping his eye on Dick, "who is this from?"
"From the Contessa Maraviglia," replied the girl.
Mr. Mole gave her a piercing glance.
The contessa's letter was a sort of puzzle to poor old Mole.
"The Contessa Maraviglia begs the honour of the Signor Mole's company on the 16th instant. She can accept no refusal, as the _f¨ºte_ is especially organised in honour of Signor Mole, whose rare excellence in the poetry of motion has elevated dancing into an art."
Isaac Mole read and re-read this singular letter, until he grew more and more fogged.
He thought that the contessa had failed to express herself clearly in English on account of her imperfect knowledge of our language; but he was soon corrected in this impression.
The lady in question, it transpired, was English.
So poor Mole did what he thought best under the circumstances, and that was to consult with Dick Harvey.
"Dear me!" echoed Dick, innocently; "why, you have made an impression here, Mr. Mole."
"Do you think so?" said Mole, doubtfully.
"Beyond question. This contessa is smitten, sir, with your attractions; but I can assist you here."
"You can?"
"Of course."
"Thank you, my dear Harvey, thank you," replied Mr. Mole eagerly.
"Yes; I can let the contessa know that there is no hope for her."
Isaac Mole's vanity was tickled at this.
"Don't you think it would be cruel to undeceive her?"
"Cruel, sir!" said Dick, with severe air, "no, sir; I don't. It is my duty to tell her all."
Mr. Mole looked alarmed.
"What do you mean?"
"That you are a married man."
"I say, I say--"
"Yes, sir, very much married," pursued Dick, relentlessly; "that you have had three wives, and were nearly taking a fourth."
"Don't, Dick."
"All more or less black."
"Dick, Dick!"
"However, there is no help for it; you will have to go to this ball."
"Never."
"You will, though. The contessa has heard of your fame in the ball room--"
"What!"
"In bygone years, no doubt--and she does not know of the little matters which have happened since to spoil your activity, if not your grace."
As he alluded to the "little matters," he
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