How to Enjoy Paris in 1842

F. Hervé

How to Enjoy Paris in 1842, by F. Herv

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Title: How to Enjoy Paris in 1842 Intended to Serve as a Companion and Monitor, Containing Historical, Political, Commercial, Artistical, Theatrical And Statistical Information
Author: F. Herv
Release Date: February 12, 2006 [EBook #17760]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
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HOW TO ENJOY PARIS IN 1842,
INTENDED TO SERVE AS A COMPANION AND MONITOR
Indicating all that is useful and interesting IN THE FRENCH METROPOLIS,
Containing HISTORICAL, POLITICAL, COMMERCIAL, ARTISTICAL, THEATRICAL AND STATISTICAL INFORMATION.
AS ALSO A DESCRIPTION Of the manners and customs of the Parisians of the present day; WITH INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE STRANGER. In Respect to Economy, and Advice to his general proceedings with the French.
By F. Herv
Author of A Residence in Turkey and Greece, etc, etc.

ILLUSTRATED BY LITHOGRAPHIC ENGRAVINGS.
PARIS, PUBLISHED BY AMYOT, 6, RUE DE LA PAIX; AND BY G. BRIGGS, 421, STRAND, LONDON, SUCCESSOR TO LEIGH & CO. 1842.

PREFACE.
In offering the following pages to the public, the author has been principally influenced by a desire of uniting useful information with that which he hopes may prove amusing to the reader, endeavouring as much as possible to keep in view the spirit of the title "How to enjoy Paris;" and having been accustomed to hear such constant and bitter murmurings from the English, in consequence of their having been so frequently imposed upon by the Paris shopkeepers, considerable pains and attention have been devoted to guard the reader against his being subjected to a similar evil; much development has therefore been afforded towards recommending those establishments where the author feels confident that the stranger will meet with fair dealing and due civility. It may, perhaps, be thought by many that he has been rather too prolix on the subject, but in order to know "How to enjoy Paris" to its full extent, the first object, is to be informed of the best means of dispensing one's modicum of lucre to the greatest advantage, which will enable the visitor to stay the longer and see the more, just in proportion as he avoids useless expenditure in suffering himself to be victimised by over charges.
As the present work includes the different subjects of History, Antiquities, Politics, Manners, Customs, Army, Navy, Literature, Painting, Music, Theatres, Performers, etc., etc., the author flatters himself that readers of every taste will find a chapter which treats upon some subject that may interest them, hoping that in the endeavour to play the r?le of the Miller and his Ass, his efforts to please may be more happy than those of that unfortunate individual.
CHAPTER I.
Hints to the English visiting Paris as to their demeanour towards the Parisians, and advice as to the best mode of proceeding in various transactions with them. An appeal to candour and justice against national prejudice.
Happiness is the goal for which mankind is ever seeking, but of the many roads which the imagination traces as the surest and nearest to that desideratum, few, perhaps none, ever chance upon the right; too many pursue a shadow instead of a substance, influenced by a phantom of their own creation, engendered in most instances by pride, vanity, or ambition. Although I do not presume to hope that I can pilot my readers to the wished-for haven, yet I flatter myself I can afford them such counsel as will greatly contribute towards their happiness during their sojourn at Paris or in other parts of France.
Patriotism is certainly a most exalted virtue, but however praiseworthy it may be in Englishmen to cherish within their own breasts the recollection that their fleets and armies have ever prevailed, that their wealth and commerce surpass those of every other nation, etc. etc. it is not absolutely necessary that they should in their outward demeanour towards foreigners, bear the semblance of constantly arrogating to themselves a superiority, of which however conscious and assured they may be, they never can teach others to feel, and least of any a Frenchman, who possesses an equal degree of national predilection as the Englishman, and the moment that sentiment is attacked, or that our Gallic neighbours conceive that an attempt is made to insinuate that they are regarded in the light of inferiority, as compared with any other nation, hatred to the individual
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