The Voyages of Captain Scott

Charles Turley
The Voyages of Captain Scott

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Title: The Voyages of Captain Scott
Author: Charles Turley
Release Date: October, 2004 [EBook #6721] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on January 24, 2003]
Edition: 10
Language: English
Character set encoding: ASCII
*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK, THE VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN SCOTT ***

This eBook was produced by Robert J. Hall.

THE VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN SCOTT
BY CHARLES TURLEY

CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
THE VOYAGE OF THE 'DISCOVERY'
Chapter I
. The 'Discovery'. II. Southward Ho! III. In Search of Winter Quarters. IV. The Polar Winter. V. The Start of the Southern Journey. VI. The Return. VII. A Second Winter. VIII. The Western Journey. IX. The Return from the West. X. Release.
THE LAST EXPEDITION
Chapter Preface
to 'Scott's Last Expedition'. Biographical Note. British Antarctic Expedition, 1910. I. Through Stormy Seas. II. Dep?t Laying to One Ton Camp. III. Perils. IV. A Happy Family. V. Winter. VI. Good-bye to Cape Evans. VII. The Southern Journey Begins. VIII. On the Beardmore Glacier. IX. The South Pole. X. On the Homeward Journey. XI. The Last March. Search Party Discovers the Tent. In Memoriam. Farewell Letters. Message to the Public. Index.

ILLUSTRATIONS
PHOTOGRAVURE PLATE
Portrait of Captain Robert F. Scott From a photograph by J. Russell & Son, Southsea.
COLORED PLATES
From Water-Color Drawings by Dr. Edward A. Wilson.
Sledding. Mount Erebus. Lunar Corona. 'Birdie' Bowers reading the thermometer on the ramp.
DOUBLE PAGE PLATE
Panorama at Cape Evans. Berg in South Bay.
FULL PAGE PLATES
Robert F. Scott at the age of thirteen as a naval cadet. The 'Discovery'. Looking up the gateway from Pony Dep?t. Pinnacled ice at mouth of Ferrar Glacier. Pressure ridges north side of Discovery Bluff. The 'Terra Nova' leaving the Antarctic. Pony Camp on the barrier. Snowed-up tent after three days' blizzard. Pitching the double tent on the summit. Ad¨¦lie Penguin on nest. Emperor Penguins on sea-ice. Dog party starting from Hut Point. Dog lines. Looking up the gateway from Pony Dep?t. Looking south from Lower Glacier Dep?t, Man hauling camp, 87th parallel. The party at the South Pole. 'The Last Rest'.
Facsimile of the last words of Captain Scott's Journal.
Track chart of main southern journey.

INTRODUCTION
BY SIR J. M. BARRIE, BART.
On the night of my original meeting with Scott he was but lately home from his first adventure into the Antarctic and my chief recollection of the occasion is that having found the entrancing man I was unable to leave him. In vain he escorted me through the streets of London to my home, for when he had said good-night I then escorted him to his, and so it went on I know not for how long through the small hours. Our talk was largely a comparison of the life of action (which he pooh-poohed) with the loathsome life of those who sit at home (which I scorned); but I also remember that he assured me he was of Scots extraction. As the subject never seems to have been resumed between us, I afterwards wondered whether I had drawn this from him with a promise that, if his reply was satisfactory, I would let him go to bed. However, the family traditions (they are nothing more) do bring him from across the border. According to them his great-great-grandfather was the Scott of Brownhead whose estates were sequestered after the '45. His dwelling was razed to the ground and he fled with his wife, to whom after some grim privations a son was born in a fisherman's hut on September 14, 1745. This son eventually settled in Devon, where he prospered, for it was in the beautiful house of Oatlands that he died. He had four sons, all in the Royal Navy, of whom the eldest had as youngest child John Edward Scott, father of the Captain Scott who was born at Oatlands on June 6, 1868. About the same date, or perhaps a little earlier, it was decided that the boy should go into the Navy like so many of his
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