The Last Poems of Ovid

Ovid
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Title: The Last Poems of Ovid
Author: Ovid
Release Date: June 24, 2007 [eBook #21920]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE LAST POEMS OF OVID***
Copyright (C) 2006 by Mark Bear Akrigg
THE LAST POEMS OF OVID
A New Edition, with Commentary, of the Fourth Book of the _Epistulae ex Ponto_
by Mark Bear Akrigg, Ph.D.

Original (unpublished) edition Copyright 1985 by Mark Bear Akrigg
First published edition, corrected and augmented Copyright 2006 by Mark Bear Akrigg

This edition and commentary are dedicated to
ROB MORROW
_"quo non mihi carior alter"_
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Acknowledgments i
Preface ii
Introduction 1
Textual Introduction 23
P. OVIDI NASONIS _EPISTVLARM EX PONTO_ LIBER QVARTVS 54
I. Ad Sextum Pompeium 56
II. Ad Seuerum 59
III. Ad ingratum 63
IIII. Ad Sextum Pompeium 68
V. Ad Sextum Pompeium 72
VI. Ad Brutum 76
VII. Ad Vestalem 81
VIII. Ad Suillium 86
IX. Ad Graecinum 93
X. Ad Albinouanum 105
XI. Ad Gallionem 113
XII. Ad Tuticanum 115
XIII. Ad Carum 120
XIV. Ad Tuticanum 125
XV. Ad Sextum Pompeium 131
XVI. Ad inuidum 136
COMMENTARY 144
I. To Sextus Pompeius 146
II. To Cornelius Severus 161
III. To an Unfaithful Friend 177
IV. To Sextus Pompeius 199
V. To Sextus Pompeius 213
VI. To Brutus 226
VII. To Vestalis 244
VIII. To Suillius 258
IX. To Graecinus 286
X. To Albinovanus Pedo 325
XI. To Gallio 359
XII. To Tuticanus 370
XIII. To Carus 389
XIV. To Tuticanus 410
XV. To Sextus Pompeius 429
XVI. To a Detractor 446
Bibliography 471
Index of topics discussed 477
Index of textual emendations 489
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Editor gratefully acknowledges the permission of the Herzog August Bibliothek for the use of Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenb¨¹ttel: Cod. Guelf. 13.11 Aug. 4¡ã (fragmentum Guelferbytanum).
PREFACE
It is a pleasure to present to the public this digital edition, with commentary, of _Ex Ponto_ IV, the final poems written by the Roman poet Ovid, published after his death as a posthumous collection quite separate from the earlier _Ex Ponto_ I-III.
These poems have a special place among Ovid's works, but have not received the attention which they deserve. In particular, there has been no full modern commentary on these poems.
This text presented in this edition is based on my personal examination of ten manuscripts. I have also restored to the text certain readings commonly accepted by editors until the nineteenth century. Finally, the edition contains several dozen new textual conjectures by myself and others.
The intended audience of this edition
This edition is intended to serve as a guide to the poems for intermediate and advanced students of Latin poetry. However, I have deliberately made it as straightforward as possible, and my hope is that even a beginning student of Latin poetry embarking on the study of these poems will find the commentary helpful.
This edition is also directed towards present and future Latin textual critics.
My expectation when starting my research for this edition was that I would be presenting a text that differed little from that to be found in current editions. However, I made two discoveries during my research into the text.
The first discovery was that many important textual corrections generally accepted in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries had been suppressed by editors in the course of the nineteenth century. I have restored many of these readings to the text, and others will be found in the textual apparatus.
The second discovery was that there was a surprisingly large number of passages which appeared to be corrupt and for which it was possible to suggest corrections. Given the long history of Latin textual criticism, and Ovid's central position in Roman literary history, it was surprising to find that so much remained to be done. Yet such was the case.
Nothing is more certain than that this book of poems as well as the three earlier books of the _Ex Ponto_ represent an outstanding opportunity for future editors and commentators to contribute to the progress of Latin scholarship.
History of this edition
I originally prepared this edition and commentary during my time as a graduate student at the University of Toronto. Upon its completion (and my graduation) in 1985, a copy was deposited at the National Library of Canada.
Had I followed a university teaching career after graduation, I would undoubtedly have taken the necessary steps to publish the edition, if only in pursuit of academic promotion. But I instead chose a career in the software industry, which both removed the external incentive to publish the edition, and denied me the time that I would have needed to prepare it for publication.
However, I wished to ensure that future editors and commentators were aware of the edition
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