Rousseau

John Moody

Rousseau, by John Morley

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Title: Rousseau Volumes I. and II.
Author: John Morley
Release Date: January 25, 2006 [EBook #14052]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
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Produced by Paul Murray, Charlie Kirschner (Vol. 1), Linda Cantoni (Vol. 2), and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net

ROUSSEAU
BY
JOHN MORLEY
VOLUMES I. and II.

London MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED NEW YORK: THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 1905
All rights reserved
First printed in this form 1886 Reprinted 1888, 1891, 1896, 1900, 1905

VOL. I.

NOTE TO THE FIRST EDITION.
This work differs from its companion volume in offering something more like a continuous personal history than was necessary in the case of such a man as Voltaire, the story of whose life may be found in more than one English book of repute. Of Rousseau there is, I believe, no full biographical account in our literature, and even France has nothing more complete under this head than Musset-Pathay's Histoire de la Vie et des Ouvrages de J.J. Rousseau (1821). This, though a meritorious piece of labour, is extremely crude and formless in composition and arrangement, and the interpreting portions are devoid of interest.
The edition of Rousseau's works to which the references have been made is that by M. Auguis, in twenty-seven volumes, published in 1825 by Dalibon. In 1865 M. Streckeisen-Moultou published from the originals, which had been deposited in the library of Neuchatel by Du Peyrou, the letters addressed to Rousseau by various correspondents. These two interesting volumes, which are entitled Rousseau, ses Amis et ses Ennemis, are mostly referred to under the name of their editor.
February, 1873.
* * * * *
The second edition in 1878 was revised; some portions were considerably shortened, and a few additional footnotes inserted. No further changes have been made in the present edition.
January, 1886.

CONTENTS OF VOL. I.
CHAPTER I.
PRELIMINARY. PAGE
The Revolution 1 Rousseau its most direct speculative precursor 2 His distinction among revolutionists 4 His personality 5
CHAPTER II.
YOUTH.
Birth and descent 8 Predispositions 10 First lessons 11 At M. Lambercier's 15 Early disclosure of sensitive temperament 19 Return to Geneva 20 Two apprenticeships 26 Flight from Geneva 30 Savoyard proselytisers 31 Rousseau sent to Anncey, and thence to Turin 34 Conversion to Catholicism 35 Takes service with Madame de Vercellis 39 Then with the Count de Gouvon 42 Returns to vagabondage 43 And to Madame de Warens 45
CHAPTER III.
SAVOY.
Influence of women upon Rousseau 46 Account of Madame de Warens 48 Rousseau takes up his abode with her 54 His delight in life with her 54 The seminarists 57 To Lyons 58 Wanderings to Freiburg, Neuchatel, and elsewhere 60 Through the east of France 62 Influence of these wanderings upon him 67 Chamb®¶ri 69 Household of Madame de Warens 70 Les Charmettes 73 Account of his feeling for nature 79 His intellectual incapacity at this time 83 Temperament 84 Literary interests, and method 85 Joyful days with his benefactress 90 To Montpellier: end of an episode 92 Dates 94
CHAPTER IV.
THERESA LE VASSEUR.
Tutorship at Lyons 95 Goes to Paris in search of fortune 97 His appearance at this time 98 Made secretary to the ambassador at Venice 100 His journey thither and life there 103 Return to Paris 106 Theresa Le Vasseur 107 Character of their union 110 Rousseau's conduct towards her 113 Their later estrangements 115 Rousseau's scanty means 119 Puts away his five children 120 His apologies for the crime 122 Their futility 126 Attempts to recover the children 128 Rousseau never married to Theresa 129 Contrast between outer and inner life 130
CHAPTER V.
THE DISCOURSES.
Local academies in France 132 Circumstances of the composition of the first Discourse 133 How far the paradox was original 135 His visions for thirteen years 136 Summary of the first Discourse 138-145 Obligations to Montaigne 145 And to the Greeks 145 Semi-Socratic manner 147 Objections to the Discourse 148 Ways of stating its positive side 149 Dangers of exaggerating this positive side 151 Its excess 152 Second Discourse 154 Ideas of the time upon the state of nature 155 Their influence upon Rousseau 156 Morelly, as his predecessor 156 Summary of the second Discourse 159-170 Criticism of its method 171 Objection from its want of evidence 172 Other objections to its account of primitive nature 173 Takes uniformity of process for granted 176 In what the importance of the second Discourse consisted 177 Its protest against the mockery of civilisation 179 The equality of man, how true, and how false 180 This doctrine in France, and in America 182 Rousseau's Discourses, a reaction against the historic method 183
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