In Troubador-Land

Sabine Baring-Gould
In Troubador-Land

The Project Gutenberg EBook of In Troubador-Land, by S. Baring-Gould #2 in our series by S. Baring-Gould
Copyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country before downloading or redistributing this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook.
This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do not change or edit the header without written permission.
Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom of this file. Included is important information about your specific rights and restrictions in how the file may be used. You can also find out about how to make a donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.
**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts**
**eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971**
*****These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!*****
Title: In Troubador-Land A Ramble in Provence and Languedoc
Author: S. Baring-Gould
Release Date: September, 2005 [EBook #8819] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on August 10, 2003]
Edition: 10
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK IN TROUBADOR-LAND ***

Produced by Distributed Proofreaders

[Frontispiece: Tower of St. Trophimus, Arles.]

IN TROUBADOUR-LAND.
A Ramble in
Provence and Languedoc.
by
S. Baring-Gould, M.A.,
AUTHOR OF "MEHALAU," "JOHN HERRING," "OLD COUNTRY LIFE," ETC.
ILLUSTRATED BY J. E. ROGERS.

"What is this life, if it be not mixed with some delight? And what delight is more pleasing than to see the fashions and manners of unknown places? You know I am no common gadder, nor have oft troubled you with travell."--Tom of Reading, 1600.
1891.

PREFACE.
With Murray, B?deker, Guide Joanne, and half-a-dozen others--all describing, and describing with exactness, the antiquities and scenery--the writer of a little account of Provence and Languedoc is driven to give much of personal incident. When he attempts to describe what objects he has seen, he is pulled up by finding all the information he intended to give in Murray or in B?deker or Joanne. If he was in exuberant spirits at the time, and enjoyed himself vastly, he is unable, or unwilling, to withhold from his readers some of the overflow of his good spirits. That is my apology to the reader. If he reads my little book when his liver is out of order, or in winter fogs and colds--he will call me an ass, and I must bear it. If he is in a cheerful mood himself, then we shall agree very well together.
S. BARING-GOULD.
LEW TRENCHARD, DEVON,
_October 28, 1890._

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
INTRODUCTORY.
The Tiber in Flood--Typhoid fever in Rome--Florence--A Jew acquaintance--Drinking in Provence--Buying _bric-®§-brac_ with the Jew--the carro on Easter Eve--Its real Origin--My Jew friend's letters--Italian dolce far niente
CHAPTER II.
THE RIVIERA.
No ill without a counterbalancing advantage--An industry peculiar to Italy--Italian honesty--Buffalo Bill at Naples--The Prince and the straw-coloured gloves--The Riviera--A tapestry--Nice--Its flowers--Notre Dame--The chateau--My gardener--A pension of ugly women--Horses and their hats--Antibes--Meeting of Honor®¶ IV. and Napoleon--The Grimaldis--L®¶rins, an Isle of Saints--A family jar--Healed

CHAPTER III.
FR®¶JUS.
The freedman of Pliny--Forum Julii--The Port of Agay--The Port of Fr®¶jus--Roman castle--Aqueduct--The lantern of Augustus--The cathedral--Cloisters--Boy and dolphin--Story told by Pliny--The _Chains des Maures_--D®¶saugiers--Dines with the porkbutchers of Paris--Si®¶y®®s--_Sans phrase_--Agricola--His discoveries

CHAPTER IV.
MARSEILLES.
The three islands Phoenice, Phila, Iturium--Marseilles first a Phoenician colony--The tariff of fees exacted by the priests of Baal--The arrival of the Ionians--The legend of Protis and Gyptis--Second colony of Ionians--The voyages of Pytheas and Euthymenes--Capture of Marseilles by Trebonius--Position of the Greek city--The Acropolis--Greek inscriptions--The lady who never "jawed" her husband--The tomb of the sailor-boy--H?tel des N®¶gociants--M®¶nu--Entry of the President of the Republic--Entry of Francis I.--The church of S. Vincent--The cathedral--Notre Dame de la Garde--The abbey of S. Victor--Catacombs--The fable of S. Lazarus

CHAPTER V.
THE CRAU.
The Basin of Berre--A neglected harbour--The diluvium--Formation of the Crau--The two Craus--Canal of Craponne--Climate of the Crau--The bise and _mistral_--Force of the wind--Cypresses--A vision of kobolds

CHAPTER VI.
LES ALYSCAMPS.
Difficulty of finding one's way about in Arles--The two inns--The _mistral_--The charm of Arles is in the past--A dead city--Situation of Arles on a nodule of limestone--The Elysian Fields--A burial-place for the submerged neighbourhood--The Alyscamp now in process of destruction--Expropriation of ancient tombs--Avenue of tombs--Old church of S. Honor®¶--S. Trophimus--S. Virgilius--Augustine, apostle of the English, consecrated by him--The flying Dutchman--Tomb of ?lia--Of Julia Tyranna--Her musical instruments--Monument of Calpurnia--Her probable story--Mathematical versus classic studies--Tombs of _utriculares_--Christian sarcophagi--Probably older than the date usually attributed to them--A French author on the wreckage of the Elysian Fields

CHAPTER VII.
PAGAN ARLES.
The Arles race a mixture of Greek and Gaulish--The colonisation by the Romans--The type of beauty in Arles--The amphitheatre--A bull-baiting--Proven?al bull-baits different from Spanish bull-fights--The theatre--The ancient Greek stage--The destruction of the Arles theatre--Excavation of the orchestra--Discovery of the Venus of Arles--A sick girl--Palace of Constantine

CHAPTER VIII.
CHRISTIAN ARLES.
Sunday in France--Improved observance--The cathedral of Arles--West front--Interior-Tool-marks--A sermon on peace--The cloisters--Old Sacristan and his garden--Number of desecrated churches in
Continue reading on your phone by scaning this QR Code

 / 105
Tip: The current page has been bookmarked automatically. If you wish to continue reading later, just open the Dertz Homepage, and click on the 'continue reading' link at the bottom of the page.